Is Your Son In Therapy?

The post Thanksgiving has yielded this, thus far:

Friend:¨Is your son still seeing a therapist?¨

Me:¨Well, I don´t know, what kind of therapist?¨ (My son sees four therapists: skills, social skills, occupational, and psychologist)

Friend:¨One for his OCD?¨

Me:¨He doesn´t have OCD.¨

Friend:¨Then what does he have that makes him not want to sit at a table with mashed potatoes or turkey at it?¨

Me:¨He is autistic.¨

Friend:¨Is the therapist working on that with him?¨

Me:¨Well, no one in our house likes mashed potatoes, so it´s hard to desensitize him to it when he never sees it. There is not much need for it.¨

Friend:¨He was never like this when you first moved here.¨

Me:¨Well, it started when he began hating eggs, and then anything lumpy, smelly, and salty like that. About two years ago.¨

Friend:¨I can see this becoming a real problem for him in the future.¨

Me:¨I am just glad he can go up the stairs by himself.¨ (He couldn´t do that for three years until last month).

 

I never know what to say to people. Having sensory issues can be hell. I am sorry for my son.  He did really well, in my opinion.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

15 Comments

Filed under ASD, Asperger's, Autism, Child Psychology, Medication, PTSD, SIngle Parenting, Trauma, Uncategorized

15 responses to “Is Your Son In Therapy?

  1. Ugh. I can think of a million snappy retorts, but none that would immediately illuminate someone so very far–right now–from understanding. “How about you google ‘autism,’ and then we revisit this conversation later?” Gah.

    • The real problem, to me, is always that people want everyone else to behave in a manner that is transparent and predictable- to them. This does not seem realistic to me, especially in regards to children. All children!

  2. People are morons, I tell you!

  3. The saddest thing about having sensory sensitivities, IMHO, is that being around “normal” people (especially people close to me) is more of a torture than having the sensitivities themselves. God forbid anyone be inconvenienced. And yes, as you said, how the hell to answer those lovely, well-meaning questions and not be insulted when what you say is dismissed.

    Thanks for sharing your experience…

    • Exactly. God forbid anyone be inconvenienced! If you think about his issue with mashed potatoes and eggs, is it really going to ruin his life, if he indeed keeps his revulsion forever? I have a childish phobia about Cheetos and no regrets, after all these years. You would think people would be concerned for my daughter, who is always pretending to be an animal. That would have far more impact on her adulthood if it continued..

  4. I don’t get it.

    But then….

    I don’t get it…

    You told her what the problem is. I would give her the url to information about Autism and expect her to demonstrate some awareness of your needs as his Mother the next time she calls with questions regarding your Son’s behavior.

    • I think she ought to be more concerned about my daughter, who is barking in her room right now. She has been a puppy for hours and is convinced she has magical changeling powers. This is a daily thing. Unfortunately, very few people have any consideration for the mothers of special needs kids. We need to just ¨try harder¨. Ha! I long for a world where differences are accepted, instead of criticized.

      • OMG…I have those powers too!

        I imagine that being a mother involves moments of hilarity…

        As for people who think that they can get over everything by ‘trying harder’…they are destined for a painful confrontation with mortality…

      • I am so glad to know that someone else has these powers and has become a decent and successful adult. I despair not!

  5. No clue….some….most….people have no clue. My ex mother in law use to ask when Little AoA was going to be “done with that ‘retarded’ class”! She has verbal apraxia and gross motor delays that went with it. Sensory issues and people with control issues don’t mix well.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s